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October Newsletter

October Newsletter


Adolescent Spinal Pain

September 2, 2014
By

While it may go unnoticed, many teens experience moderate to severe spine pain. A two-year study of teens found that “the two-year incidence of spinal pain varied between 40% and 60% across the physical locations.”

The study went on to note that “spinal pain is common at the age of 11-15 years, but some have more pain than others. The pain is likely to progress, i.e., to more locations, higher frequency, and higher pain intensity over a two-year period.”

Given these results, teen spines should be checked frequently, especially those of athletes. Talk to your doctor of chiropractic about how often your teen should have a spinal check up.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain).

METHODS:

This study was a school-based prospective cohort study. All 5th and 6th grade students (11-13 years) at 14 schools in the Region of Southern Denmark were invited to participate (N=1,348). Data were collected in 2010 and again two years later, using an e-survey completed during school time.

RESULTS:

The lifetime prevalence of spinal pain was 86% and 89% at baseline and follow-up, respectively. A group of 13.6% (95% CI: 11.8, 15.6) at baseline and 19.5% (95% CI: 17.1, 22.0) at follow-up reported that they had pain frequently. The frequency of pain was strongly associated with the intensity of pain, i.e., the majority of the participants reported their pain as relatively infrequent and of low intensity, whereas the participants with frequent pain also experienced pain of higher intensity. The two-year incidence of spinal pain varied between 40% and 60% across the physical locations. Progression of pain from one to more locations and from infrequent to more frequent was common over the two-year period.

CONCLUSIONS:

Spinal pain is common at the age of 11-15 years, but some have more pain than others. The pain is likely to progress, i.e., to more locations, higher frequency, and higher pain intensity over a two-year period.

Over-the-Counter Heart Danger

June 24, 2014
By

Most people pop aspirin and other over-the-counter pain relievers without a second thought. But mounting evidence suggests that there should be cause for concern. In a recent study, researchers found that “NSAID (aspirin, ibuprofen, Advil, Motrin, etc.) use was associated with an increased risk of death or myocardial infarction (heart attack) by up to 5 times that of non-users. There was also a clear indication for a dose-related response in risk associated with NSAID therapy, supporting a causal association. Notably, the cardiovascular risk associated with NSAID treatment was prevalent at start of treatment, suggesting no safe treatment window for NSAIDs in patients with cardiovascular disease. Thus, evidence from observational studies is accumulating, suggesting that NSAIDs are a major public health concern due to the widespread use of these drugs.”

The impact of NSAID treatment on cardiovascular risk - insight from Danish observational data.

Abstract

This MiniReview describes the present evidence for the relationship between cardiovascular risk and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with special focus using Danish register-based data. NSAIDs are among the most widely used drugs worldwide and mainly used for management of pain and inflammatory conditions. Through the past decade, much attention has been given to the cardiovascular safety of these drugs, and several studies have shown increased risk of adverse cardiovascular effects associated with NSAID use. Current guidelines discourage any use of NSAIDs in patients with cardiovascular disease, yet over a period of 8-10 years, 35-44% of patients with myocardial infarction or heart failure were exposed to NSAIDs in Denmark. Furthermore, NSAID use was associated with an increased risk of death or myocardial infarction by up to 5 times that of non-users. There was also a clear indication for a dose-related response in risk associated with NSAID therapy, supporting a causal association. Notably, the cardiovascular risk associated with NSAID treatment was prevalent at start of treatment, suggesting no safe treatment window for NSAIDs in patients with cardiovascular disease. Thus, evidence from observational studies is accumulating, suggesting that NSAIDs are a major public health concern due to the widespread use of these drugs. Although it seems unlikely that we can completely avoid use of NSAIDs, even among high-risk patients, these results highlight the importance of balancing the benefit versus the risk of treatment before initiating NSAID treatment.

© 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).


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